The 1831 Voters and Can They Be Identified

This has been copied from two other webpages word for word, in an effort to make it more accessible. No infringement is intended.

based on an original transcription by Renee’ Gore
I think it would be an interesting project to identify these men and learn more about them. As I find notes or remember records, I will add notes here. If you want to contribute please send your email to mflp@aol.com and identify them by  1831vote – (their number) .   All notes are by Donna unless otherwise specified.

Harnage, Ambrose
List of White men with Indian wives  Harnage, Ambrose lived Long Swamp
Prescribed Oath List  wife 5 children
1830 Gwinnett p. 374
It is interesting that the election was to be held at Ambrose Harnage’s house but he didn’t vote. Tate, Pickens County, GA was originally called Harnageville, after Ambrose Harnage, in whose house the early court was held.

1 . ? , Nathaniel G. (possibly Nathaniel G. Henderson)   LINK

2 . ? , William (will we ever know?)

3 . ALLISON, David
Prescribed Oath List  md 9 children

Continue reading

Eleanor Allen Schrepel-From Ireland to the Mormon Promised Land

Eleanor Allen Schrepel

I am so excited that I found a photo of this woman!  This is Eleanor Allen, who married John Frederick Schrepel in 1865.  Their daughter Louisa Schrepel married John J. Downer their son John Albert Sr. is my Grandfather.
She was a Mormon Pioneer and part of the Martin Handcart company that walked 1200 miles from Iowa to Salt Lake City Utah and nearly didn’t survive! Continue reading

The Long life, three wives, and fake death of Elias Goddard

See PDF link below for timeline. DNA has proven the link between descendants of his first family and descendants of his 2nd family.
I have had this theory for several years now, due to the little overlap in where Elias was in Indian Territory and his slightly younger 2nd self in GA.  I guess the promise of a 14 year old wife at age 38 was enough to make him leave his first family behind.

Elias Goddards TIMELINE Condensed2016

Elias’ son, John Willis Goddard, b. 1837.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Many Layers of the Journey

When I started this blog, I simply wanted to leave a legacy of stories for my family, with photos and any reminiscences neatly wrapped up in one package.  What I did not expect is something more closely resembling a spiritual journey-one that has helped me to uncover parts of myself, and my own deep connections to the families and stories I wanted to preserve.
I’ve been a fan of “Who Do You Think You Are?” for a long time, and I think every single person who’s been on that show by the end of it finds some deep connection to the people and stories they uncover.  Everyone takes a journey when they seek out their ancestors and I don’t think anyone expects what they find.
When you have just a name or a date or a photograph, you have something flat and two dimensional, but when you find details, stories, loves and heartaches, blessings and tragedies, these people become real-and all the more real because they are your relatives.
I think it’s natural that we see ourselves in them, and now we know that through “epigenetics” and DNA they really are within us-we carry their passions, their talents, and sometimes their bad traits too. It’s rather amazing when it unfolds.
This journey into finding my ancestors is vast-it gets exponentially bigger with each generation. The story fans out across the globe and through DNA, even my mostly European self touches almost every continent on the planet.
This has been a really fascinating journey for me-and one that’s become by obsessive and beloved hobby.  I am learning more and more about DNA, genetics, genealogy, ancestors, history, migration patterns, and how family stories change  over time.
Now I understand why many cultures have “ancestor worship”-better described as “reverence for the ancestors”…It’s a way of connecting on a very deep level with who we are-as a single person, as a family, as a culture, tribe, race, and human species.
And it is terribly evident in much of American culture today, that the lack of connection we modern folks have, is not good.
We need those connections. We need to remember these people and their stories and we need to share these stories with others. What we lose if we don’t tell the story is our soul. If we don’t share the memories, and share the bad things and the good, if we don’t tell the stories and tales about all of our own relatives and their adventures and sorrows, we lose our soul.

So this has become something much bigger for me than just family remembrances to share with future generations. It has become a path home-one I hope I can share with others. A path that I hope I can write down in some sort of cohesive outline and share with others in hopes that others can walk this same pattern-although it will be their own personal path, and reconnect with themselves.
I truly believe that in some way, our ancestors are still living, still with us, still able to guide us, and we owe them gratitude.
Something good is going to come out of this, I think. I’m just on a different path than I thought I was when I started! Stay tuned.
IMG_5597

The Case for Elizabeth Gibson Being Daughter of Demarcus and MaryAnn Walker

Many people have seen the 1850 Crawford County Missouri census with “my” Elizabeth Gibson and her three children (Hannah Parilee, Joseph Kelly and Willa Ann Gibson) living with Demarcus and MaryAnn Blevins Walker, and many have just assumed she was their grown daughter.

But we can’t make that assumption, especially because at the same time there is an E. (Emmaline) Arney living there too. She is a cousin to MaryAnn, likely looking for a husband among three eligible cousins and she does eventually marry the eldest Walker son in residence, George Washington Walker.
So we cannot assume that Elizabeth Gibson is their daughter. Continue reading

Up the Crabtree Tree

I thought I’d work on this line a bit-especially people I have photos of.
I found out through DNA testing of my male kinfolk that while the paternal Crabtree NAME comes from West Yorkshire, England, the DNA is actually Scandinavian-probably Viking, probably from the time after the 900’s when the Vikings had a strong presence in much of eastern England.
Where I’ve always sort of ignored the paternal line-because it was boringly “English” I’m now curious-after all, it is where we get the really tall, long-faced bodies from, and one can hope just a little Viking toughness as well. This map (link) shows that the W. Yorkshire DNA is distinctively different from the Southern and Eastern British Isle DNA…As are the Welsh, Cornwall and Devon areas (which is my Whitecotton family-a post for another time)…

So from me to my Dad (John William Crabtree), then back to his Dad (John Willis Crabtree), we have his father, Alexander Wilson Crabtree.
Left, below. Center is Alexander’s wife, Alice Rosaline Goddard Crabtree.
“Rosa” and Alex had 5 children, and then Alex died, of appendicitis, leaving Rosa with five children and extreme poverty.

Alexander Wilson Crabtree Alice Rosalin Goddard Crabtree  Sylvester Crabtree

 

Family stories have it that she was so poor she could not afford medicine when her kids got sick, so when she needed something she would ask someone going across the river to stop in with some Native folks that people called “the root diggers” and get some wild-harvested medicine. (That’s where I get my love of herbal medicine!) Rosa was also a midwife, not only to those being born, but sometimes to those dying as well.
After Alex died, Alex’s brother Sylvester (right, above) married Rosa. They had two more children, for a total of 7.
My dad used to say they had the “10 year club” going in the family. Rosa’s first son, my grandfather John Willis Crabtree, was born close to the end of 1886.
His full brother, Frank was born in 1897, and their half brother Thom was born in 1907.  Then in 1917, my grandfather had my Dad, so there was 10 years between each of them. Apparently my dad remembers this conversation while he and Thom were brushing their teeth around the cistern.

Alexander and Sylvester’s mother was Elizabeth Crabtree, born 1837.

ElizabethCrabtree-AlexMom

Elizabeth(1) married Thomas M. Crabtree(2) and yes, they were 2nd cousins.

Elizabeth(1)’s father was William W.G. Crabtree(3), below.

William W.G.(3-note middle initial)’s father is William(5).

 

WilliamCrabtree

 

Thomas M (2)’s father is William T.(4-note middle initial).
William T (4)’s father was Thomas (6).

William(5) and Thomas (6) were sons of (you guessed it!) William and Ann Riley Crabtree.

If that’s as clear as mud, try the diagram, below.  Elizabeth and her husband/2nd cousin Thomas M. are on the right. They shared the same Great Grandparents. (Perhaps this accounts for their son Alexander being what looks like cross-eyed?)

Note also in the diagram below that one brother married a Sarah Flory and one married Sarah Flory Graham-they were likely also cousins, which, ugh, is just weird. Apparently there were no other dateable women except cousins?

 

Screen Shot 2015-06-05 at 7.47.59 PM